Promising gene therapy research at Denmark's National Hospital  

2005.08.30
The Department of Radiation Biology at Denmark's National Hospital has developed a gene therapy which in laboratory tests efficiently kills cancer cells from patients with small cell lung cancer

The Department of Radiation Biology at Denmark's National Hospital has developed a gene therapy which in laboratory tests efficiently kills cancer cells from patients with small cell lung cancer. The results have recently been published in the respected scientific journal Cancer Gene Therapy.

Hans Skovgaard Poulsen, who heads the Laboratory of Radiation Biology, comments on the new discovery: "By applying gene therapy to cancer cells in our laboratory, we can make the cells more vulnerable to an otherwise harmless drug used for the treatment of colds [ganciclovir]". The treatment kills the cancer cells efficiently, and if normal cells are exposed to the same treatment they survive it. This could mean fewer side effects provided that the research effort succeeds in transferring the principle to humans.

The Laboratory of Radiation Biology has initiated a collaboration with US researchers who have experience in developing lipid nanoparticles which can be used as means of transport for the gene treatment to target cancer cells in humans.

The new gene therapy will be tested on mice in the near future. Hans Skovgaard Poulsen says that if the treatment works in mice, the research will have reached a stage where the idea can be sold to a pharmaceutical company. The news is reported by professional journal Ingeniøren (The Engineer) and on cancer.dk.

Link > Department of Radiation Biology 

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