Danish research team makes major IT breakthrough  

2006.05.16
A DTU research team has invented an efficient method of converting electronic signals into light signals and has taken a major step towards replacing electronic data transmission in computers with light transmission

A research team at the Department of Communications, Optics & Materials, the Technical University of Denmark, (COM DTU), has invented an efficient method of converting electronic signals into light signals and has taken a major step towards replacing electronic data transmission in computers with light transmission. The invention was published in the May 11 2006 issue of the scientific journal Nature.

Rune Shim Jacobsen, one of inventors at COM DTU explains: "Computer chips are made from silicon, and our optic modulator which also is made from silicon, will make it possible to combine optics with electronics. An optic modulator will be able to make PCs significantly faster than today. In addition it will multiply the speed of the internet delivered to users."

Silicon based nanophotonics is a very active research area worldwide because of the great potential to integrate optics and electronics on the same computer chip. This objective is being actively pursued by the likes of IBM and Intel as well as Japan's NTT. DTU has now added its name to the list.

A start-up company, SEMuS (Silicon External Modulator using Strain), has been established on the strength of the invention. The firm has gained solid investment from Seed Capital. Rune Shim Jacobsen says: "Now we will do everything to improve the technology which makes silicon electro-optically active. The objective is to produce an attractive new modulator based on the discovery of electro-optic silicon." The news was reported by Erhvervsbladet.

Link > COM DTU 

Next step

Explore business cases

Please contact me

Name
Company
E-mail
Phone
How can we help you?

IDK
We use cookies to make the website perform optimally. You accept cookies by closing the box or continuing to use the website. Click here to read more about cookies. ×