International Maritime Organisation chooses Denmark as venue for key meeting  

2007.10.08
167 member states are attending a meeting of the International Maritime Organisation in Denmark, the choice of which is seen as an indication of the country's rising reputation as a shipping nation
This week, the Bella Center in Copenhagen is hosting an important meeting of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), a United Nations agency concerned with the safety of shipping and cleaner oceans. The venue is unusual in that the IMO routinely holds Maritime Safety Committee meetings at its Albert Embankment premises in London, and is being seen as an indication of Denmark's rising reputation as a shipping nation, reports Idag. 167 member states are attending the IMO meeting.
 
The Minister for Economic and Business Affairs, Bent Bendtsen, who also has ministerial responsibility for shipping, commented that a lot of hard work had gone into bringing the IMO meeting to Denmark and added: "Denmark has a large and well-reputed merchant fleet and is a major player on the international scene. Danish shipping companies have 300 new ships on order, worth over 80 billion kroner [USD 15 bn]."
 
Danish shipping companies already transport 10% of global sea freight. The Danish Shipowners' Association aims to increase that figure to 15% and is on course for achieving it, thus fulfilling the government's ambition to see Denmark become Europe's leading maritime nation.
 
In 2001 Danish shipping companies earned DKK 100 bn (USD 19 bn). In 2006 the figure was DKK 160 bn (USD 30 bn), and in 2007 earnings are expected to top DKK 180 bn (USD 33.7 bn) despite the weakness of the dollar. The Danish merchant fleet is one of the world's youngest and most modern, with an average age of seven years compared to the world average of about 13 years.
 

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