New logistics system for ocean transport of live shellfish will halve costs  

2008.06.25
Maersk Line and Aqualife Logistics have developed what is reported to be the world's first logistics system for ocean transport of live shellfish from continent to continent
Maersk Line, a division of Denmark's A.P.Moller-Maersk Group, and Danish engineering company Aqualife Logistics have developed what is reported to be the world's first logistics system for ocean transport of live shellfish from continent to continent. The Aqualife system can half transportation costs and significantly reduce CO2 emissions compared to air freight, writes professional journal Ingeniøren (The Engineer).
 
Lars Nannerup, director of Aqualife Logistics says: "If we do our job right, our system can lead to the same development in the market for shellfish as we have seen in international trading of fruit. The seasons are being expanded to almost the entire year and you can receive fresh goods from the whole world."
 
The Aqualife system consists of a customised transport container which has 20 tanks, each containing 1,500 litres of water and up to 600 kg of live shellfish. One container can carry up to 12 ton of live shellfish. On land the container is connected to a special docking station with a purification plant and recirculation of water.
 
Maersk Line is currently transporting the first containers with crabs and other delicacies from the US and Canada to Spain.
 
The Danish shellfish industry says the system can both provide new opportunities and increased competition. Svend Larsen, director of Læsø Fiskeindustri, which has major exports of frozen Norwegian lobsters, says:  "The new technology could make it interesting to us to start exporting live Norwegian lobsters."
 
Link > Aqualife Logistics    

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