DTU sets world record for high speed data transmission  

2009.10.20
A research team at the Technical University of Denmark has set a new world record for high speed communication – 5.1 terabits per second
A research team at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has set a new world record for high speed communication, reports professional journal Ingeniøren (The Engineer). Having been the first to break through the 'terabit barrier' earlier this year, the DTU team has now managed to ramp up the bit rate to 5.1 terabits per second, thus overtaking the previous record of 3.56 terabits per second set by the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute in Berlin.
 
5.1 terabits per second (5.1 million million bits per second) is an awesome data transmission speed, which DTU has achieved using extremely high frequency light pulses fired down optical cables. By modulating the signal and employing optical multiplexing techniques, it is possible to gain a fourfold increase in the bit rate in relation to the pulse frequency, and that is exactly what DTU has demonstrated.
 
It is likely that DTU's breakthrough will have significant implications for the future of the internet, where data volumes are increasing at the rate of 60% annually. Faster data transmission speeds also have environmental benefits, since less electricity consumption equates to less CO2. At present, the internet is responsible for 1% of the world's entire CO2 emissions.

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