Danish fledgling firm develops nanotechnology for solar cells  

2009.09.16
After four years of effort, the Funen-based fledgling company Nanofiber has succeeded in creating a new type of organic nanofibre that can be used in solar cells
After four years of effort, the Funen-based fledgling company Nanofiber has succeeded in creating a new type of organic nanofibre that can be used in solar cells, writes professional journal Ingeniøren (The Engineer). The fibres have promising properties in regard to efficiency and production costs.
 
Professor Horst-Günther Rubahn of the University of Southern Denmark, whose research provided the foundation of the new company, told Ingeniøren: "The advantage of the organic fibres is that they can be chemically tuned so that they are sensitive across a very large portion of the light spectrum, and this increases their efficiency. But it's crucial that the fibres lie in an orderly manner, so that the electric charge doesn't dissipate away. That requires order at both the nano and molecular level."
 
The fibre production method is now finalised, but the development work to incorporate them into a real solar cell has just begun. Rubahn reckons it will take six months to build a demonstration model, and then 3 to 4 years to make the finished product.
 
The aim is to produce a solar cell with an efficiency of about 6% energy conversion. If the production costs can be kept down, and the solar panel's durability made sufficiently good, Nanofiber has a chance of growing a profitable business.
 
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