Promising Danish solar cell technology gets funding boost  

2009.05.29
The Danish High Technology Foundation is putting DKK 10m into the development of a solar cell technology that promises significantly higher energy conversion efficiency
Amongst the countries of Europe, Denmark has a leading reputation in renewable energy technology. This is especially so for renewables such as wind energy, biomass and to a growing extent, wave power, but in the solar power area the country has a somewhat more modest profile. This is not due to any lack of ideas or promising technology however, but rather a lack of targeted investment.
 
Financial daily newspaper Børsen writes that The Danish High Technology Foundation wants to start changing this situation, and is putting DKK 10m (USD 1.9m) into supporting the development of a solar cell technology that promises significantly higher energy conversion efficiency than can be achieved with convention solar cells.
 
The Danish spin-off company Sunflake is developing a new generation of solar cell based on novel semiconducting nanostructures called nanoflakes, which reportedly have the potential to convert 30% of solar energy into electricity (currently employed solar cell technology manages around 20% at best).
 
Backed by the new funding, Sunflake will begin a collaboration with the Nanoscience Center at the Niels Bohr Institute to push the technology forward to a level where it can become commercially interesting. Sunflake's director Martin Aagesen told Børsen: "When we combine Sunflake's nanostructure and knowledge with the research resources of the Nanoscience Center and the Niels Bohr Institute, we can collectively achieve more than we would working by ourselves."
 
Link > Sunflake                    

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